Slovenia with kids: a 3-day itinerary

I have just read an article where Slovenia was being compared to New Zealand. They called Slovenia the New Zealand of Europe. And I thought, yes! Absolutely. Unspoilt nature. Hundreds of outdoor activities to choose from. Dramatic landscape. And living the slow life.

Slovenia with kids: a 3 day itinerary

We didn't really know what to expect. We just booked somewhere that was not too far and looked relaxing for a short week. I have to say we were all very pleasantly surprised and will definitely go back.

Slovenia with kids: a 3-day itinerary
Bled Island
Slovenia with kids: a 3-day itinerary


Day 1:
Our first day was spent taking it slowly around Lake Bled. The village itself was not that interesting but the lake's surroundings were stunning.

Lake Bled, Slovenia
Rowing on Lake Bled

In the morning, we rowed across the lake to the little island. The kids loved that, of course. The island is full of little legends and history. The many steps and slope make it tough but fun to explore with kids. We had a delicious ice-cream while there before going back.

Bled Island, Slovenia
Bled Island

In the afternoon, we climbed up to the castle. It is small but interesting and there is the best view from up there, of course.

Bled Castle, Slovenia
Bled Castle
Slovenia with kids: a 3-day itinerary
Bled Castle
We ended the afternoon with a dip into the lake from the tiny beach near our campsite. A perfect slow and fun day.

Lake Bled, Slovenia
Look at that water!
Swimming in Lake Bled
Swimming in Lake Bled

Day 2:
On day 2, we set off for Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia. It is just over an hour's drive from Lake Bled. It is not a huge city so it is easy to walk around. We rode the little train up the hill to the castle and spent time munching on delicious and local cherries from the market.

Slovenia with kids: a 3-day itinerary

The market is actually quite unique. It takes up a huge space in the city. Buildings along the river are full of small stalls on two levels and squares along the way are also filled with sellers. Each area has its speciality: from cherries to meat to flowers to clothing.

Ljubljana, Slovenia
Ljubljana

If you fancy trying typical Slovenian food, we liked Vodnikov Hram near the little castle train stop (at the bottom of the hill). It was recommended to us by a Slovenian friend. It serves typical generous Slovenian food with a modern touch and is centrally located.

Postojna Caves, Slovenia
Postojna Caves

After our lunch, we headed out to the Postojna Caves about 30 minutes away. Caves are very common around this part of the world. But these are the must-see attraction of Slovenia. At 24000m long, it is the second largest cave system in Slovenia. They are karst caves. The site is huge and there are several other smaller attractions on site too. The tickets are not cheap (especially for a family). Is it worth it? Well, the kids loved the little train that you ride (for a little while) on to go deep inside the caves. They liked the hour-long walk inside the cave much less. Seeing the cave from the little train was enough. You get ferried inside and have to take a walking tour along with about a hundred other people. Even our 7-year-old had had enough. Caves are caves. Learning about them was fun but all of the formations look the same after a while. We would do it again but be more prepared for the long guided and very busy guided walk.

Postojna Caves, Slovenia
Inside Postojna Caves

Day 3:
After a busy second day, we took it slow. We drove a mere 30-minutes to Lake Bohinj. The road from Bled follows a gorgeous river and the landscape is dotted with little villages and Alpine houses.

Lake Bohinj, Slovenia
Lake Bohinj

There are many outdoor activities on offer around Lake Bohinj (kayaking in particular). After throwing rocks in the lake and taking into the magnificent landscape, we found a stream feeding the lake (at the Western end of it). We set up our picnic blanket there and spent the day dipping our toes in the stream to cool off (water comes from the mountains so it was very cold in May), eating and playing. The water in the stream was amazingly transparent while we had found some spots around the lake to be a little dirty (near the shore).

Lake Bohinj: Slovenia
Stream feeding in to Lake Bohinj

Glamping in Lake Bled, Slovenia
Glamping in Lake Bled

Glamping in Lake Bled: We stayed in a little hut in a corner of a campsite. It was fabulous. We had a great view and everything we needed. There are only 4 of these little huts so it didn't feel like crowded. The site is literally across the road from the quiet part of Lake Bled. There is a small supermarket and a restaurant on site as well as playgrounds. It was clean, very practical and ideal with small children. We would definitely go there again.

Glamping near Lake Bled, Slovenia
Our glamping hut, Lake Bled, Slovenia
Glamping in Lake Bled, Slovenia
Glamping with a view
Glamping in Lake Bled, Slovenia
The kids' quarters in our glamping hut

Travel tip: if you are taking your own car to Slovenia, you need a vignette (a road tax sticker). These are decently priced for a short stay (I think we paid €15 for a week). If you don't have it, you will be photographed and a lovely bill will arrive at your home later (yes, even if you live abroad). The easiest way to buy it is to stop at a petrol station before entering the country and buy it there. Most major roads advertise them.
Slovenia with kids: a 3-day itinerary





Slovenia with kids: a 3-day itinerary
Pin me to read later




1 comment:

  1. Slovenia is one of my favourite places. It sounds like you had a lovely holiday. I love Lake Bohinj and can't wait to go back there, hopefully in winter as we have spent two summers there now. We found Postonja a little too manicured and the tour too short. We preferred the Skocjan caves which are wilder and more interesting, we spent about 4 or 5 hours exploring the. Other places we loved were Ptuj and Lipica and the Velika Planina alpine meadows. Worth mentioning that along with the sticker for Slovenia you need one in Austria and Hungary (if you are going there) as well. I think some other countries also require them but I can't remember the other places we bought them. We were stopped by a traffic cop on the Austrian border and had to drive back to the nearest petrol station to buy one. They warned us about the need for one in Slovenia as well. I think the cop charged us Euro200 for not having it so an expensive mistake.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for your feedback.

Template developed by Confluent Forms LLC; more resources at BlogXpertise